IDGsupply.com: Preparing for a Hurricane

History teaches that a lack of hurricane awareness and preparation are common threads among all major hurricane disasters. It is essential that  Businesses and Homes be ready before a storm approaches to protect your employees and family.

Emergency Plans – Develop and Document Plans for your Specific Risks

  • Be sure to plan for locations away from home
  • Business owners and site locations should create Workplace Plan
  • Make sure schools and daycares have School Emergency Plans
  • Pet owners should have plan to care for their animals.  The Centers for Disease Control & Prevention offer information on animal health and impact of evacuation shelters.
  • Prepare your boat and be aware of marine safety  if you are on or near the water.

Providing a basic disaster supply kit is essential when preparing for a hurricane. The following recommended items are things you should considering when planning what to pack:

  • Water, one gallon of water per person per day, for drinking and sanitation
  • Food, at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food
  • Battery-powered radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert, and extra batteries for both
  • Flashlight and extra batteries. We recommend: Pelican, Streamlight and Rayovac
  • First Aid kit
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Infant formula and diapers, if you have an infant
  • Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation. We recommend: Kimberly-Clark Professional and GOJO
  • Dust mask or cotton t-shirt, to help filter the air. We recommend: North by Honeywell
  • Plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place. We recommend 3M and Intertape Polymer Group (IPG)
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities. We recommend: Irwin and Channellock
  • Can opener for food (if kit contains canned food)


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Additional Supplies

Once you have gathered the supplies for a basic emergency kit, you may want to consider adding the following items:

  • Prescription medications and glasses
  • Infant formula and diapers
  • Pet food and extra water for your pet
  • Cash or traveler’s checks and change
  • Important family documents such as copies of insurance policies, identification and bank account records in a waterproof, portable container. You can use the
  • Emergency reference material such as a North’s Basic First Aid Pocket Reference Book. Another great reference is A Preparedness Guide from the U.S. Department of Commerce.
  • Sleeping bag or warm blanket for each person. Consider additional bedding if you live in a cold-weather climate.
  • Complete change of clothing including a long sleeved shirt, long pants and sturdy shoes. Consider additional clothing if you live in a cold-weather climate.
  • Household chlorine bleach and medicine dropper – When diluted, nine parts water to one part bleach, bleach can be used as a disinfectant. Or in an emergency, you can use it to treat water by using 16 drops of regular household liquid bleach per gallon of water. Do not use scented, color safe or bleaches with added cleaners.
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Matches in a waterproof container
  • Feminine supplies and personal hygiene items
  • Mess kits, paper cups, plates, paper towels and plastic utensils
  • Paper and pencil
  • Books, games, puzzles or other activities for children

Essentials of Managing Water

Never ration drinking water unless ordered to do so by authorities.
Drink the amount you need today and try to find more for tomorrow. Under no circumstances should a person drink less than one quart (four cups) of water each day. You can minimize the amount of water your body needs by reducing activity and staying cool.

Drink water that you know is not contaminated first.
If necessary, suspicious water, such as cloudy water from regular faucets or water from streams or ponds, can be used after it has been treated. If water treatment is not possible, put off drinking suspicious water as long as possible, but do not become dehydrated.

Do not drink carbonated beverages instead of drinking water.
Carbonated beverages do not meet drinking-water requirements. Caffeinated drinks and alcohol dehydrate the body, which increases the need for drinking water.

Turn off the main water valves.
You will need to protect the water sources already in your home from contamination if you hear reports of broken water or sewage lines or if local officials advise you of a problem. To close the incoming water source, locate the incoming valve and turn it to the closed position. Be sure you and your family members know how to perform this important procedure.

Essentials of Managing Food

Following a disaster, there may be power outages that could last for several days. Stock canned foods, dry mixes and other staples that do not require refrigeration, cooking, water or special preparation. Be sure to include a manual can opener and eating utensils. Consider the following things when putting together your emergency food supplies:

  • Store at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food.
  • Choose foods your family will eat.
  • Remember any special dietary needs.
  • Avoid foods that will make you thirsty.
  • Choose salt-free crackers, whole grain cereals and canned foods with high liquid content.
  • Ready-to-eat canned meats, fruits, vegetables and a can opener
  • Protein or fruit bars
  • Dry cereal or granola
  • Peanut butter
  • Dried fruit
  • Nuts
  • Crackers
  • Canned juices
  • Non-perishable pasteurized milk
  • High energy foods
  • Vitamins
  • Food for infants
  • Comfort/stress foods